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Five Free Student Tickets for the SaberSeminar in Boston (August 17-18, 2014)

Meredith Wills, Will Carroll and myself are donating four student two-day tickets, including lunch, for the upcoming baseball analytics Saberseminar run by Dan Brooks. This is a wonderful event, and 100% of the proceeds are donated to the Jimmy Fund. You must be a current student. Meredith and myself will by choosing four students by the end of this week, Sunday April 13, 2014.

Please note:
  • These tickets are for both days, August 17-18, 2014
  • The event is in Boston, MA
  • Lunch is included, but no other meals
  • Transportation and lodging are not included

If you would like to be considered for a donated ticket, please send:
  • Your full name (first and last)
  • If you're outside of the Boston area, how will you be getting to the event?
  • Your school affiliation and whether high school or college
  • Best contact email address (if different from reply-to address)
  • A little about your baseball interests, analytical or otherwise
  • Do you see yourself working in baseball? For a team, as a journalist, or something else?

Please email the above information to me at sabermetrics@gmail.com.

Again, please do so by the end of the day on Sunday, April 13, 2014. Once the tickets are awarded they're gone.

Comments

  1. Greetings Christopher am interested to chat with you about your work the horse racing industry using predictive analytics/machine learning methods -i am based in Sydney Australia

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